Stonewall Rebellion – June 28, 1969

Today marks the 47th anniversary of the Stonewall Rebellion, also referred to as the Stonewall Uprising, a watershed event in the history of LGBT civil rights in the United States. “In the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, New York City police raided the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar located in Greenwich Village, New York City.” [1] Rather than dispersing as was the usual course of action after all too frequent police raids, the patrons defied the police, and a large crowd of neighbors and allies grew around the bar, forcing the police to remain in the Stonewall Inn until reinforcements arrived. The following night, the crowd outside the Stonewall Inn grew and continued the clash with police for six day before the riots ended in early July.

Commemoration of the Stonewall Rebellion is the reason June is currently proclaimed Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Pride Month; for more details from see the Library of Congress post.

To learn more about this seminal event and its significance please consult a variety of these resources used to prepare the above summary. 

Carter, D., Dolkart, A. S., Harris, G., & Shockley, J. (1999).  National Historic Landmark Nomination – Stonewall (USDI/NPS NRHP Registration Form 10-900).  Washington, D.C.: National Park Service. Retrieved from https://www.nps.gov/nhl/find/statelists/ny/Stonewall.pdf.   See pages 7 – 27 for concise and documented summary of events and significance, followed by an ample bibliography.

Frank, W.  (2014).   Law and the gay rights story: The long search for equal justice in a divided democracy.   New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press.  See chapter 2: Stonewall (1969). E-book: http://endeavor.flo.org/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1997761

[1] Mucciaroni, G. (2013). Stonewall Rebellion. In R. Chapman & J. Ciment (Eds.), Culture wars in America: An encyclopedia of issues, viewpoints, and voices. London, United Kingdom: Routledge. Retrieved from https://library.emmanuel.edu:8443/login?url=http://search.credoreference.com/content/entry/sharpecw/stonewall_rebellion/0.  Brief overview.

Office of the Press Secretary. (2016). President Obama Designates Stonewall National Monument. Washington, D.C.: The White House. Retrieved from: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/06/24/president-obama-designates-stonewall-national-monument

For fuller treatments, consult the following: 

Carter, D. (2004). Stonewall: The riots that sparked the gay revolution. New York: St. Martin’s Press.  Print: http://endeavor.flo.org/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=743505 (On Display)

Corporation of Public Broadcasting. (n.d.). American Experience Online: Stonewall Uprising.  Retrieved from http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/features/introduction/stonewall-intro/ .  See timelines, photo gallery, biographies, documents etc. associated with Stonewall Uprising DVD.

Rosenberg, R., Scagliotti, J. & Schiller, G. (1985).  Before Stonewall: The making of a gay and lesbian community [DVD].  New York, N.Y.: First Run Features.   http://endeavor.flo.org/vwebv/holdingsInfo?searchId=591&recCount=10&recPointer=3&bibId=783158

Scagliotti, J.  (2005). After Stonewall: From the riots to the millennium [DVD].  New York, N.Y.: First Run Features. http://endeavor.flo.org/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=783159

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